American Stalls: Designing Your Dream Barn

Windkiss Ranch in Vero Beach, FL, a breeding barn for Gypser Vanners

By Troy Anna Smith 

Yash Balasaria, CEO of American Stalls, has one overriding goal for his family business.  “We are just looking to make your life easier!” he cheerfully tells The Plaid Horse. Balasaria has redesigned his father’s business in less than three years, taking great pride in both their customer service and craftsmanship. Barns built by American Stalls are staples on Pinterest and continue to win over customers all over the country. 

A family owned and operated company, American Stalls began in 2005 with Balasaria’s father Niraj, a steel manufacturer by trade. The company helped manufacture portable stalls for the traveling horse shows, including HITS. The company gained experience by helping to work on thousands of horse barns across the United States. 

In 2017, Balasaria joined the team to begin an expansion and reinvention of the company. “We revamped our product line and manufacturing to build the finest products,” he says. “We have then built a world-class team who deliver world-class customer service.” 

American Stalls shifted their focus from volume to quality. Targeting the majority of the new stalls on safety, Balasaria explains how the craftsmanship was redesigned in many ways to avoid injury for both the person and the horse: “Simple corrections can be made to give you the highest quality set-up, like round bars rather than solid bars that are safely spaced and galvanized steel for rust protection.”


Private polo training and boarding barn in Barrington Hills, IL  

Family Values

Founded and built on family standards, the Balasaria group continues to pride themselves on a set of business principles that never stopped working: Innovation, transparency, and customer service. 

Balasaria plans to continue to push the boundaries with the business. American Stalls is proud to never be complacent, and always looking for ways to improve the current design. Balasaria uses the stall door latch as a key example. 

“We want the latch we offer on year one to be working just as well on year ten. A stall with a broken latch is useless. Everything should effortlessly glide on the tenth year,” he says.

As for communication with their customer, American Stalls aims for transparency. “When it comes to the sales process, we like to treat your barn like it’s ours,” Balasaria says. “We educate our clients to ensure they’re experts in what they’re adding to their barns.” 

Additionally, American Stalls values a strong and long-term customer service approach. The business model is relationship driven. “Regardless of the price or stabling needs, we will always treat you like family,” he adds. 


A private dressage barn in Middleburg, VA

Designing Your Dream Barn

The design process of an American Stall will vary from client to client. Depending upon whether you are the barn owner, an architect, or the contractor, building a new space, or working on a renovation, the choices you make depend on a variety of factors. 

“There is a consultative design process. Depending on the barn, one will need to know the facility’s purpose: commercial, training, or private. What are the personalities of the horses? The answers to these questions affect the design options greatly,” he says. “Interestingly enough, horse doors with low yokes for horse heads work only for barns where your horses get along well with a low rotation. Training barns’ needs will vary greatly from your own private barn. Design factors change considerably.”


Private hunter jumper barn in Franklin, TN

Even the aesthetics of the design can vary based on discipline—a dressage barn will not always look the same as a western pleasure barn. “But either way, we are with our client through the entire process, through the initial meeting, FaceTime, and will fly out during construction if necessary,” he says. 

American Stalls not only services your dream barn, but provides barn doors, flooring, lighting, farm gates, barn windows, and portable horse stalls. Education is also key for the company, especially as it relates to safety and avoiding the potential dangers seen in barns across the country. And they do it all with transparency. “Our motto,” he concludes, “is honesty.” 


*This story was originally published in the December 2022 issue of The Plaid Horse. Click here to read it now and subscribe for issues delivered straight to your door!

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