Hoof

Picture by Sara Shier Photography

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About Kendra Skorstad

Kendra Skorstad brings artistry, science, and her love for horses together in her life long career as a farrier and horsewoman. She is highly sought after in her community with her experience as a barefoot trimmer and farrier. She is proficient using new technologies and alternative materials for hoof protection. In her teamwork approach, she embraces a balance between research based work and honoring the individuality of each horse.

Her personal journey in life has shaped her approach to create a safe space for horses to be able to be in a relaxed and receptive state so that her work can have the highest benefit to the whole horse. She gives them a foundation from which everything else can be balanced and built upon.

Her experience rehabilitating hooves on performance horses and the negative hoof morphology she sees in the hooves linked with injuries to the body is the driving force behind her desire to educate horse owners about the hooves and how they impact the whole horse. She believes every horse owner should have access to fact based, unbiased information about hoof care to be able to make informed decisions and advocate for their horses.

Her commitment to her own continuing education and sharing what she can with others has led to her giving clinics and lectures around the US and internationally, being interviewed in a variety of podcasts on The Whole Horse, The Plaid Horse, and The Humble Hoof, guest lecturing for the University of Guelph for the last 5 years as well as developing hoof related material for their Functional Anatomy course.

Her education doesn’t stop with the hoof. As a rider and driver, she is committed to understanding the horse as much as possible and the dynamic connection between the hoof and horse.

Podcasts

Plaidcast 247Plaidcast 186

The Whole Horse

The Humble Hoof

“I talk a fair bit about wanting to help horse owners be able to have discussions with their veterinarian or farrier. It can certainly be difficult to have a conversation with someone in a place of perceived authority, let alone question them.”I talk a fair bit about wanting to help horse owners be able to have discussions with their veterinarian or farrier. It can certainly be difficult to have a conversation with someone in a place of perceived authority, let alone question them.

I am not here to discredit any professional, vet or farrier or otherwise, I will assume they have put in countless exhausting hours educating themselves and caring for horses because they have a passion for horses and that they do.

The truth is, no one person can know everything and when the very education they received is flawed to begin with or still evolving, we have to ask questions. We have to hold each other accountable. The horse will be better for it.” – Kendra Skorstad

Contact

sksfarrier2@gmail.com

Eagle, WI

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